Find Nursing Schools Near Me in District of Columbia

Why Nursing in District of Columbia?

District of Columbia Registered NurseNurses are an integral part of any District of Columbia medical team, and for a number of patients, their primary care providers. A nursing career opens doors to a number of opportunities, including research, health care education and specialty areas of practice. Nurses go into the profession for various reasons, among the most meaningful are its personal and practical rewards. Nurses provide personal, one-on-one care to patients. Most individuals in a hospital or home care environment spend more time with nurses than with doctors. Nurses frequently choose the profession out of a desire to administer to the needs of patients, including in situations of short-term treatment of illness and extended care of chronic conditions. This humanistic side of the healthcare profession, as opposed to the analytical or research related elements, is appealing to many who elect to enter into a career in nursing. Nurses have a wide range of applicable skills and can choose from an assortment of work environments, such as District of Columbia nursing homes, physician’s offices, medical clinics, community centers and hospitals. Also, nurses can progress into a number of specialties, including substance addictions, critical care, neonatology and genetics. While most nurses provide primary patient care, others choose to be teachers, policy consultants and pharmaceutical representatives.

Interviewing for a Nursing Position

District of Columbia registered nurse as a guardian angelWhen prepping to interview for a nursing position in District of Columbia, it’s advantageous to reflect on questions you might be asked. Among the questions that hiring managers frequently ask nursing applicants is “What drove you to pick nursing as a profession?”. What the interviewer is attempting to discover is not only the personal reasons you might have for being a registered nurse, but additionally what characteristics and talents you possess that make you outstanding at what you do. You will probably be asked questions relating primarily to nursing, along with a significant number of general interview questions, so you should organize several ideas about how you want to answer them. Given that there are so many factors that go into choosing a career, you can answer this fundamental question in a number of ways. When readying an answer, aim to include the reasons the profession interests you as well as the strengths you have that make you an excellent nurse and the perfiect choice for the job. Don’t attempt to memorize an answer, but jot down several concepts and talking points that pertain to your personal strengths and experiences. Reviewing sample answers can help you to develop your own concepts, and give you ideas of what to discuss to enthuse the interviewer.

Considering Nursing in District of Columbia?

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, first President of the United States and Founding Father.[5] Washington is the principal city of the Washington Metropolitan Area, which has a population of 6,131,977.[6] Washington is described as the political Capital of the World, owing to its status as the seat of the United States Federal Government and numerous international institutions, such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund.[7] Washington is one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million annual tourists.[8][9]

The signing of the Residence Act on July 16, 1790, approved the creation of a capital district located along the Potomac River on the country's East Coast. The U.S. Constitution provided for a federal district under the exclusive jurisdiction of the Congress and the District is therefore not a part of any state. The states of Maryland and Virginia each donated land to form the federal district, which included the pre-existing settlements of Georgetown and Alexandria. Named in honor of President George Washington, the City of Washington was founded in 1791 to serve as the new national capital. In 1846, Congress returned the land originally ceded by Virginia; in 1871, it created a single municipal government for the remaining portion of the District.

Washington had an estimated population of 693,972 as of July 2017. Commuters from the surrounding Maryland and Virginia suburbs raise the city's population to more than one million during the workweek. The Washington metropolitan area, of which the District is the principal city, has a population of over 6 million, the sixth-largest metropolitan statistical area in the country.

Other Neat Cities in District of Columbia

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